Seminars, 2011
Lectures:
  • December 26, 2011
    Mosaic image creation. Encountered Problems and Their Solutions
    Dr. Karelin Irina, Algorithm Manager, CMosaix Company

     

    Abstract
    Creation of mosaic image whose parts are small images acquired from many cameras is widely used idea. Usually these small images suffer from many problems such as different types of noises, geometric distortion, intensity discrepancies of one to another etc. The above problems should be solved for all small parts. Enhanced small images are arranged into large image whose quality is depends on quality of small parts and smoothness of seams in stitching as well. Various mathematical methods are applied for solving all these problems.

  • December 5, 2011

    Riemannian Penrose Inequalities with Charge
    Professor Gilbert Weinstein, Monash University, Australia

     

    Abstract
    The Riemannian Penrose inequality states that the total mass of an asymptotically flat 3-manifold with non-negative scalar curvature is not less than half the area radius of the outermost horizon with equality only in the case of the Schwarzschild metric. Several natural generalizations to the charged case can be proposed. We present counter-examples to some of these generalizations and discuss a tentative approach to prove the remaining one.

  • November 28, 2011

    Human Population Genetics: Methods and results from a study on Jewish populations
    Dr. Naama Kopelman ,Tel Aviv University, University of Michigan and Stanford University

     

    Abstract
    The aim of research on human genetic variation is to study the differences among individuals and populations. Each gene or genetic marker can have a number of variants called alleles, and different people can have different alleles. On the population level, different populations are characterized by different allele frequencies. In population genetics, these different frequencies are used, in combination with a variety of computational tools, in order to learn about the history of the human population as a whole, and of specific populations. For example, research on genetic variation of different populations around the world has shown that in Africa the level of genetic variation is highest, and decreases with the distance to Africa, leading to the conclusion that the origin of all human populations is in Africa.
    I will open with general background on genetics, genetic data and genetic markers. I will then survey a number of computational tools which are widely used in working with genetic data (phylogenetic trees, clustering, MDS). Finally, I will present results from a study of a number of Jewish populations and their relations with non-Jewish populations from the Middle East and from Europe.

  • April 4, 2011

    Bio-Mathematical Modeling of Viral Dynamics
    Dr. David Burg, Ohalo Academic C

     

    Abstract
    The aim of bio-modeling is to formulate equations based on biological knowledge. These models are usually simple ordinary differential equations that take into account the main, necessary or sufficient mechanisms that describe the biological system. Analytical solutions of the mathematical model are insightful to the complex interplay among the parameters and variables. Comparison of the theoretical predictions against experimental and clinical data is the 'benchmark' for the validity of accepted explanations and/or theories embodied in the mathematical model. Models that, when compared to data, prove unacceptable are revised, taking into account other terms and/or more complex ideas. However, even simple mathematical models have shifted paradigms about the mechanisms of disease dynamics in a number of models, most notably, HIV, HCV and HBV; and in studies of cancer. Even more importantly, novel information derived directly from the mathematical model allows therapy regime optimization, which has lead to higher success rates in combating disease. I shall introduce the basis of bio-modeling, as well as, the results of several of my modeling studies in viral dynamics, early prediction of disease and treatment outcomes and the role of the immune system during pathogenesis in humans and animal models.

  • March 21, 2011

    Towards Topological Groupoidification
    Dr. Aviv Censor, Tel Aviv University

     

    Abstract
    The aim of bio-modeling is to formulate equations based on biological knowledge. These models are usually simple ordinary differential equations that take into account the main, necessary or sufficient mechanisms that describe the biological system. Analytical solutions of the mathematical model are insightful to the complex interplay among the parameters and variables. Comparison of the theoretical predictions against experimental and clinical data is the 'benchmark' for the validity of accepted explanations and/or theories embodied in the mathematical model. Models that, when compared to data, prove unacceptable are revised, taking into account other terms and/or more complex ideas. However, even simple mathematical models have shifted paradigms about the mechanisms of disease dynamics in a number of models, most notably, HIV, HCV and HBV; and in studies of cancer. Even more importantly, novel information derived directly from the mathematical model allows therapy regime optimization, which has lead to higher success rates in combating disease.
    I shall introduce the basis of bio-modeling, as well as, the results of several of my modeling studies in viral dynamics, early prediction of disease and treatment outcomes and the role of the immune system during pathogenesis in humans and animal models.

  • February 28, 2011

    Overview of Mathematica 8 for Education and Academic Research
    Beccy Remenji, Wolfram Research Inc., International Business Development Executive

     

    Abstract

    • This seminar gives an introduction and overview of Mathematica within pre-college, community college, and four-year college classrooms.
      Topics
    • Editing text, generating quizzes, and making presentations
    • Using free-form input to enter calculations in everyday English
    • Creating models in Mathematica to investigate classroom concepts
    • Accessing ready-to-use teaching models in math, physics, chemistry, biology, economics, engineering, music, and other subjects
    • Utilizing visualization tools and annotated graphics
    • Experiencing Mathematica's integrated data sources for chemicals, particles, cities and countries, financial instruments, astronomical objects, etc.
    • Applying and integrating data sources across disciplines and school departments
    • Using Mathematica's built-in documentation
    • Exploring the numerous resources available to teachers and researchers